Frogs: Weird and Wonderful

A nonfiction picturebook

9781838227401-ColorCase-1 book front cov

An introduction to the weird and wonderful world of frogs. Discover frogs as big as cats, frogs as small as a fingernail, frogs with see-through skin, poisonous frogs, flying frogs, frogs with claws, greedy frogs and more.

 

Each page is supported by fun facts, covering important subjects such as the lifecycle, diet, and habitat, touching gently on the theme of habitat loss and what frogs need to survive.

Included at the end of the story is a wonderful full colour frog diagram to scan and print, along with folding instructions to make your own paper frog, or even an army of paper frogs!

View a video of the book and interactive activity here.

Available now on Amazon

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Reviews

Quite likely, when many children imagine a frog, they think of similar, familiar small green specimens. Ingledew’s (Ugly Ollie) fun and educational children’s picture book will expand their options. Frogs introduces a bumper crop of colorful, surprising frogs from around the world, with Ingledew’s accurate and arresting drawings giving vivid life to her descriptions. Ingledew highlights the curious and dangerous, explaining just how poisonous the most poisonous of all frogs might be, and entertaining her readers by depicting the world’s smallest frog, from Madagascar, sitting on the head of the world’s largest, the cat-sized Goliath from Western Africa.

 

For all the fun, Frogs proves thorough, as Ingledew explains the life cycle of frogs--what tadpoles eat, when and how many eggs are laid, what stage they can leave the water and why--and memorably addresses key questions. Kids and adults needing to brush up on the definition of “amphibian” or the distinction between a frog and a toad will appreciate her efforts.

Ingledew is adept at guiding young readers through text, illustrations, and layout. Her inviting pages abound with realistic depictions of near-fantastical creatures like the strawberry poison dart frog, set amid bugs, leaves, and short statements of fact, both about frogs in general and each highlighted subspecies. She vividly highlights the organs visible through the thin skin of the South American glass frog and celebrates, in a spread that captures momentum and excitement, the athletic wonder that is Wallace’s Jumping Frog. The final pages hint at a message warning about the impact of water pollution on the world’s amphibians, but Frogs never quite addresses the issue. In addition to the welcome nature lesson, Ingledew dedicates a page to an activity for children to make their own frog by folding, with the option of cutting out bugs for the paper frogs to try to catch.  Booklife reviews 

 

Frogs by Leah Ingledew | BookLife